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Monthly Archives: June 2013

21
Jun
2013

NSA Prism Surveillance – The Future Of Big Data Storage And Security

by Administrator

NSA Prism Surveillance – The Future Of Big Data Storage And Security

In recent weeks the media has been reporting heavily about the Prism surveillance program of the National Security Administration (NSA). For a moment, lets leave all the political discussion aside, and take a closer look at the sheer volume of data allegedly being managed by their clandestine data center because it brings some mind-bending mathematical realities to light in terms of scope and scale.

According to an in-depth report by Wired Magazine, the NSA Prism data center consists of “25,000-square-foot halls filled with servers, complete with raised floor space for cables and storage. In addition, there will be more than 900,000 square feet for technical support and administration. The entire site is self-sustaining, with fuel tanks large enough to power the backup generators for three days in an emergency, water storage with the capability of pumping 1.7 million gallons of liquid per day, as well as a sewage system and massive air-conditioning system to keep all those servers cool. Electricity will come from the center’s own substation built by Rocky Mountain Power to satisfy the 65-megawatt power demand.”

That much space and computing power is being harnessed so that the system can process, store and utilize yottabytes of data. A yottabyte is a data size so large that even until recently there was no consensus about what to name the next higher magnitude of data because it wasn’t in any danger of being reached. Even writing out the size of a yottabyte by hand can be tiring – a one followed by twenty-four consecutive zeros.

Eric Schmidt of Google once estimated that the total of all human knowledge from the start of human existence to 2003 could be store as 5 exabytes of information. However, the Internet covers much more than pure knowledge – bringing in far ranging aspects of personal communication, culture, and interaction. According to a report by Cisco, global web traffic is expected to more than quadruple between 2010 and 2015 to reach approximately 965 exabytes of data per year. Keep in mind, a single yottabyte is a million exabytes of data.

If the NSA does manage to collect a yottabyte of information, it would be equal to about 500 quintillion pages of text. A standard piece of paper is 0.09652 mm thick, meaning if you stacked 500,000,000,000,000,000,000 of them, all one on top of the other, your paper pile would be large enough to travel to the moon and back more than 50 million times.

The era of big data is clearly upon us, as we shift away from learning and relearning the same information to a point at which we are able to store, access and utilize information so quickly and reliably that it becomes part of our present perspective, rather than scattered abstracts that we try to gather together all over again and again each tine we need them.

On a commercial level, keeping pace with the growth of data and maintaining the infrastructure to manage or utilize it all efficiently will become one of the most pressing issues facing the IT world in the months and years to come. Finding a colocation solution that provides more than Ping, Power and Pipe from a technology partner committed to staying ahead of the curve will be even more essential to the success of your business than it already is today.

NationalNet brings all of the mission critical services, optimization and support functions your business needs to succeed as part of a fully managed hosting solution that scales seamlessly to suit the ‘exabyte needs’ of high volume clients today, and the ‘yottabyte needs’ that are likely to become commonplace in the online marketplace of tomorrow.

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18
Jun
2013

Apple Products Clear The Way For 802.11ac Networking

by Administrator

At their Word Wide Developer Conference (WWDC) Apple’s CEO Tim Cook and Jony Ive, the company’s Senior VP for design unveiled many new software and design improvements for Apple devices. While most media attention was given to the new interface design elements, gesture commands and iOS 7 upgrades, a very significant move toward the 802.11ac Networking WiFi protocol went largely unnoticed by the public – even though it is likely to have the most significant impact of all the innovations announced.

802.11ac is the next generation of WiFi and while it is already on the road to becoming the new standard, it has not taken root across all platforms yet. Lauded previously by a Cisco whitepaper as “a faster and more scalable version of 802.11n,” this fifth evolution of WiFi will allow wireless digital throughput with speeds of up to 1.3 Gigabits per second, more than doubling the bandwidth available from the current 802.11n industry standard. Perhaps even more importantly, 802.11ac introduces greatly enhanced scalability by allowing access for as many as eight multiple input, multiple output (MIMO) streams and multi-user MIMO, which will be a terrific leap forward from the four stream capacity of current 802.11n WiFi.

Part of the technological improvement comes from a new technique known as “beam-forming”, which directs a concentrated wireless signal to a specific device or location so that one device can access a greater proportion of the bandwidth available on a network. However, the technology requires both an 802.11ac wireless device and a router or base station that supports the new protocol. At the WWDC Apple announced that their new Airport Extreme base station and the 2013 MacBook Air will feature full 802.11ac support, while existing devices will be able to upgrade Airport Express for approximately $200.00 as a one time fee.

In the past, draft spec versions like 802.11ac have taken as long as five or six years to become the new industry standard because hundreds of companies are involved in developing Wi-Fi and provide a massive amount of input regarding the features being implemented. Even after a new specification is deemed to be technically and legally sound, there is still a lengthy administrative process that takes place before the new standard is ratified globally. For that reason, 802.11ac was expected to be approved and published in 2014 with new hardware using the protocol not expected to reach the market until 2015 or the following year.

Now, Apple appears to be jumping forward and counting on their considerable market share among mobile device users to push 802.11ac as quickly as possible, making the mobile version of your websites an even more important aspect of successful hosting than they have already become.

National Net continues to monitor the progress of 802.11ac, and will provide updates here on our blog that inform our clients about the technological advancements due out in the coming months. We are also taking all of the necessary steps to ensure that your hosting is able to handle the considerable growth of mobile broadband capacity, with scalable solutions designed to provide all of the throughput your customers demand at prices that demonstrate the highest level of connectivity and data efficiency.

Read More From These Sources For Further Information

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/wireless/ps5678/ps11983/white_paper_c11-713103.html

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17
Jun
2013

Cold Fusion at Last?

by Administrator

Cold Fusion at Last?

The holy grail of energy research, Cold Fusion, is again in the spotlight. Italian inventor Andrea Rossi claims his Energy Catalyzer (dubbed E-Cat) is capable of of 10,000 times the energy density and 1,000 times the power density of gasoline. Imagine running an entire data center off a single device the size of one cabinet! If a successful cold fusion device were finally built, with future miniaturization, every colocation cabinet could be run off its own, independent cold fusion power supply.

Until that day when cold fusion power supplies are readily available, NationalNet will continue to use grid power, backed up by world-class interruptible power supply and dual backup generators to keep our Atlanta data center and your Atlanta colocation servers and fully managed servers running 24/7.

Contact a NationalNet sales associate to talk about a business Atlanta colocation solution or fully managed hosting solution tailored to your company’s needs. Call us at 1-888-462-8638 or find us online at http://www.nationalnet.com

SOURCE: http://ow.ly/m7R07

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03
Jun
2013

Is your web hosting ready for 5 Gigabit Wireless?

by Administrator

5G Gigabit Wireless is Coming

Researchers at Samsung have successfully developed an ultrafast wireless technology they are officially dubbing “5G” (here we go again with the naming games- remember 4G LTE vs WiMAX vs EV-DO Rev C?). The technology has already be tested on the data-congested streets of New York City, showing gigabit speeds using an array of 64 antennas. The problem of building those antennas into a practical device that fits in your pocket is yet to be solved.

With ever increasing speeds over wireless devices, is your company’s data hosting solution ready? National Net’s colocation services are! We offer burstable bandwidth options, or choose your own carrier from hundreds in our SSAE 16 certified N+1 data center.

Contact a National Net sales associate to talk about a business colocation solution tailored to your company’s needs. Call us at 1-888-462-8638 or find us online at http://www.nationalnet.com

SOURCE: http://ow.ly/lFiXV

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