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Monthly Archives: August 2013

28
Aug
2013

Mark Zuckerberg’s Plan To Provide Universal Internet Access

by Administrator

Today, approximately 2.5 billion people have some form of internet access. Mark Zuckerberg, founder and CEO of Facebook, recently announced the launch of internet.org, a consortium of handset makers including Nokia, Samsung, Ericcson), browser companies like Opera, infrastructure companies such as Qualcomm and MediaTek. Declaring internet connectivity a human right, the internet.org alliance has the stated goal of making internet access available to the remaining 5 billion people on the planet.

The group intends to drastically cut the cost of basic internet service, especially for mobile phone data plans in developing countries. A key part of lowering costs will be reducing the bandwidth required for Facebook and other apps by simplifying the applications so they run more efficiently and by improving the components of phones and networks so that they transmit more data while using less power. In an interview in Wired Magazine, Zuckerberg talks about reversing the course of ever-increasing bandwidth requirements for applications like Facebook to make it more affordable for those in developing nations. While phones have gotten to be relatively inexpensive, the cost of data plans remains unaffordable for many: “In the beginning of this year, the average person used about 12 megabytes for the Android app on Facebook, and I think over the next couple of years, we’re going be able to get that down to one megabyte a day, with very few changes. Since one megabyte is still too much for a lot of the world, the question becomes, Can you get to half a megabyte or a third?”

Zuckerberg foresees the cooperation of members of the consortium leading to a text-based internet service that would provide the equivalent of an “Internet Dial Tone” for free. A minimum level of service that would include access to useful information like Wikipedia, search engines, social networks, weather access, and commodities prices for anyone anywhere anytime.

Declaring that this project is simply too large to be undertaken as a strictly philanthropic venture, internet.org attempts to marry the greater societal good with the demands of capitalism, and it might very well work. All of the tech companies in this sector are under pressure to find long term growth, and the developed markets are at near-saturation, making emerging markets an attractive avenue for the kind of growth Wall Street demands.

Internet.org is not the only entity experimenting with this business model either. Google, which is notably absent from the coalition has its own program that its testing with phone carriers in developing countries, giving users free access to Gmail, search and the first page clicked through from a search’s results. Twitter, which is currently preparing for its IPO, has set up deals with 250 mobile companies in more than 100 countries to offer free Twitter access.

From within the coalition, Nokia recently ran an experiment with Facebook and the Mexican phone carrier TelCel where they bundled Facebook with some of Nokia’s Ahsa phones. The resultant rise in sales of those phones made such a good business case for the practice that they’ve expanded the program to Africa and India, partnering with Bharti Airtel, one of the larger mobile carriers that serves both the continent and subcontinent.

On the infrastructure front, Qualcomm has created new chip designs to maximize phone battery life and worked out compression schemes that reduce the amount of data needed to transmit a video significantly. They’ve also come up with miniature cell service transmitters to extend the reach of mobile networks with devices that are the size of WiFi routers rather than the large, expensive, tower-mounted arrays that are prevalent in the developed world.

In an article in the New York Times, it’s pointed out that the profit potential of connecting more people to the internet is already obvious in places like the Philippines, where the second-largest mobile phone company, Globe Telecom, used free Twitter, Facebook and Google access as a promotion to increase the number of its 37 million users who also subscribe to a mobile data plan to 20 percent from virtually zero in just two years. “Once you’re connected, you’re connected, and you don’t want to look back,” said Peter Bithos, Globe’s senior adviser for consumer business.

Answering critics that say that this is merely an expansion plan for Facebook, wearing a humanitarian cloak, Zuckerberg replies: “Of course, we want to help connect more people, so theoretically we do benefit from this. But that criticism is kind of crazy. The billion people who are already on Facebook have way, way more money than the next 6 billion people combined. If we wanted to focus on just making money, the right strategy for us would be to focus solely on the developed countries and the people already on Facebook, increasing their engagement rather than having these other folks join. Our service is free, and there aren’t developed ad markets in a lot of these countries. So for a very long time this may not be profitable for us. But I’m willing to make that investment because I think it’s really good for the world.”

NationalNet continues to pursue technological advancements in the area of collocated hosting, data center infrastructure upgrades and optimization techniques that improve efficiency. In the recent past, bandwidth costs have dropped considerably and significantly lowered the hosting expense of most online entities – but these developments show that reducing bandwidth consumption is important for reasons that go beyond lowering a monthly hosting statement. In the very near future, maximizing revenue for any web service or digital product may be as much about delivering it in the fewest data packets possible as it ever was about reliable up-time or anything else.

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21
Aug
2013

Judge Rules IP Masking is a Violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act

by Administrator

Judge Rules IP Masking is a Violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act

 

In a court decision with potentially far-reaching unintended consequences, US District Judge Charles Breyer has ruled that circumventing an IP address blockade to connect to a website when you have been properly notified that the website wants you to stop visiting it is a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (CFAA).

 

Passed by Congress in 1984, the highly controversial CFAA law was intended to combat hackers, attaching both civil and criminal penalties to enhance the government’s ability to prosecute anyone who accesses computers to steal information, or to disrupt and destroy computer functionality. More recently, the government has interpreted the anti-hacking provisions to include seemingly mundane and commonplace activities that may go so far as violating a corporate website’s terms of service or a company’s computer usage policy.

 

This particular case is involves 3Taps, an aggregator of Craigslist ads that allowed users to search all of Craigslist’s sites nationwide rather than checking each individual local Craigslist when searching for an item. While 3Taps may argue sites like theirs are providing a service to sellers and buyers, indirectly increasing the value of Craigslist’s ads, the management of Craigslist didn’t see it that way. After sending a cease-and-desist letter to 3Taps, Craigslist blocked the IP addresses 3Taps used to access Craigslist sites.

 

3Taps allegedly circumvented the blockade by masking their IP addresses, and continued scraping ads from the site, resulting in a lawsuit filed by Craigslist claiming a violation of the CFAA. In it’s argument before the court, Craigslist asserted that by spoofing their IP address, 3Taps committed “access without authorization,” which seems to be interpreted as the online equivalent of breaking and entering. 3Taps took the position that the sites were publicly accessible by anyone with an internet connection and that there was no legal framework for a site owner to have a legally enforceable revocation of access for any specific user of a website.

 

While friend-of-the-court briefs filed by technologists indicated that simple IP address masking should not constitute hacking, the judge disagreed, and stated in his decision that he did not think ordinary people mask their IP addresses – especially after being sent a cease and desist letter to put them on notice that their access invitation had been revoked. Some argue in the wake of the decision that courts fail to understand just how easy and widespread the practice of IP masking is on the internet these days as people seek to maintain some level of anonymity from advertisers and spying eyes. The result of this decision is that 3Taps will face a civil damages trial unless they settle with craigslist out of court, and they may also face criminal prosecution under the law as well though experts argue that is unlikely in this instance. 

 

Meanwhile, in an official statement issued on their website, 3Taps has indicated that they will continue to aggregate Craigslist ads, stating: “Although craigslist may use the CFAA as currently interpreted to prevent 3taps from accessing its servers, 3taps can continue to function because directly accessing these servers is only one of three ways in which the information in question can be obtained. The other two, crowd-sourcing and public search results, require no such access to craigslist’s servers and thus obviate the need to engage in conduct that may implicate the CFAA. Going forward, 3taps will operate based on its understanding that if it does not access craigslist’s servers, it has a right to collect public information originally posted on craigslist’s website.”

 

The larger implication of this ruling is that relatively average users, now have a ruling that sets precedent in some jurisdictions, that if you do something to access a site by circumventing an IP block, whether to access a forum that has blocked your IP address, or something spoof your IP address to watch shows on the BBC’s Online UK-only iViewer from the United States to watch the latest episodes of Downton Abbey or Doctor Who, you may now be subject to the same harsh penalties intended for criminal hackers which include potential prosecution under the CFAA.

 

NationalNet will continue to monitor this ongoing litigation and work with our clients to secure their sites from malicious access by hackers while delving more deeply into the privacy implications that a ruling of this sort may have on the evolution of the internet itself, and the ways people use it in the months or years to come.

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15
Aug
2013

Is the End of the Desktop OS in Sight?

by Administrator

Is the End of the Desktop OS in Sight?

First developed by the engineers at Xerox PARC, apocryphally ‘stolen’ and improved by Steve Jobs and Apple before finally being brought to everyday use by Microsoft Windows, the Graphical User Interface (GUI) and underlying desktop Operating System have become synonymous with computers. GUI proliferation ended tedious typing of arcane code and democratized computer use to the point that even an 80 year old techno-phobic person is now capable of sending email and using online banking.

The development of the desktop operating system is perhaps the most important development in the history of consumer computing. Regardless of what operating system you use, be it Windows, OSX or a Linux-based systems, the same point and click principles apply – but regardless of their similarities in concept, the underlying code for all of these systems is entirely different, making cross-platform computing a complicated and often impossible endeavor that requires developers to write multiple versions of the same product software from scratch to fit each device and OS individually. Perhaps worst of all, good devices that lack market share are often overlooked by developers and fail to ever gain traction in the market because they never reach critical mass from an available software perspective, which stagnates innovation and leaves only a few entrenched platforms to serve a customer base that thirsts for more innovation.

The rise of mobile devices has only made matters more complicated with many different operating systems in play. Sure, one option is to seal yourself off in an all-Apple or All-Microsoft walled garden, but for most people this really isn’t a desirable decision. The annoyance and lost productivity resulting from trying to remember the idiosyncrasies and keyboard shortcuts of the OS you’re using at the moment and the non-compatibility of software across various platforms used by business colleagues frustrates users and stifles team productivity. These hurdles may soon be cleared, thanks in large part to the increasing capabilities of web-based computing products and a move toward generic industry standards like HTML5 which may lead to the demise of proprietary desktop operating systems and a new era of brand-agnostic connectivity.

While Apple and Microsoft have vested interests in keeping their operating systems alive and viable, the seeds for their coming irrelevance have already been planted. HTML5 is quickly becoming the standard for delivering web-based applications, and the beauty of these programs is that they look and work the same way, regardless of what platform is underlying the content. Cloud-based computing is moving user data and software applications online – with a soon approaching moment when people will have ubiquitous access to their data from any terminal, be it a PC running Microsoft Windows, an Apple running OSX, or a smartphone running Google Android – in essence removing the operating system from the equation in much the same way that phone carriers have seen their role reduced to providing relatively generic bandwidth for all devices.

As we’ve become accustomed to having access to our applications wherever and whenever we want them to be available, the question looms: Why shouldn’t we simply access our own personalized web-based desktop? Online computing, storage, data access and hosting have become as fast and in many ways even more reliable than a personal physical hard drive in a computer under your desk. Browser-based interfaces will offer a level of consistency and ubiquity that proprietary hard drive based OS software simply can not match.

Microsoft made an attempt at unifying all of their disparate operating systems with Windows 8, giving it the same look across all devices, and eliminating the system’s iconic “Start” button, but the results were confusing to many users and complaints eventually brought Windows 8.1 which restored the old Start button. The idea behind it was good, but in the end the failure of this approach was that it was merely a cosmetic attempt to unify the systems, rather than a true integration of all devices from your cell phone to your tablet to your car console, gaming system, Facebook account, home automation devices and beyond. Unifying ‘all things Microsoft’ simply doesn’t have the same power or same allure that unifying ‘all things digital’ will have on the mass market.

Google is already delivering web-based spreadsheets, word processing and an app launcher built into it’s Chrome browser. Dropbox is allowing users to move and store files across platforms, and the moment seems reminiscent of the time when computer scientists were able to get things done but the world lacked the point and click capability that would eventually drive the entire consumer market to adopt powerful new technologies.

The move to web-based computing will reduce costs for corporate IT departments, vastly simplify the process of updating software or hardware, and usher in a new era of fully managed computing that gives users the freedom to utilize their skills and talents while having technical experts quietly keeping the platform in proper working order behind the scenes. NationalNet is at the forefront of the Fully Managed Hosting and Collocated Server markets with a state of the art data center that provides efficient, high speed connectivity and the best possible level of data reliability. Those exact same skills may soon be put to use by individual people collocating their personal computing power and seeking fully managed computing services which leave the technical aspects of software compatibility, virus protection, data security, hardware integration and everything else ‘under the hood’ to a team of IT experts who can be counted on to keep their entire suite of applications optimized at all times.

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12
Aug
2013

The History of NationalNet

by Administrator

This article was written by our President, Bill VanVorst in response to customers wanting to know more about the history of NationalNet.

The History of NationalNet

Once again, my websites are down – for the third time in a week. It’s 1996 and I have a few small brochure based websites for my company hosted at a web host that seemed to be a good choice when I selected them.  I call customer service and no one answers the phone so I make the decision to move my sites to another hosting company.  Two months into this new hosting company, my sites are so slow I can barely load them.  Their support tries to convince me that it must be a server issue and that I’ll have to figure it out on my own. Of course, I know better.  Hosting websites can’t be that hard, I think to myself – why so many issues?

It was about this time that I met Tony Morgan.  Tony posted on a forum looking for someone to write a small stats program and I offered to do for him.  We agreed on a price and I completed the program for him.  Because he had sites similar to mine, we started trading traffic and soon became friends.  Tony had a web development and design company but was also having similar issues where his sites were hosted.

It was shortly after this in 1998 that Tony had the opportunity to purchase National Internet, as it was called at the time (national-net.com).  I received a call from Tony asking that if he bought it, could I manage it.  It was only eight servers and I knew I could manage them without any problems at all in my spare time.  At the time, we had no intentions of being in the hosting business, but at least now we had full control of our hosting and no one to blame but ourselves if the sites were down. Plus, the revenue from the existing customer base would allow us to have free hosting of our own sites. That is the day that we began to call it NationalNet.

Because Tony was based in Atlanta and the servers were in Florida, he leased a couple of racks in a small data center in downtown Atlanta and we moved the eight tower servers to these racks and set up a nice little network. That night, Tony confided in me that until that day he had never even seen a web server live and in person.  That, however, was quite OK because that is why he had me.  I lived in Tucson at that time and did all the management remotely.  We set up a small phone system in Atlanta that would forward support calls to my phone in Tucson but most support was done via email.  Any time a customer would email support, I would drop whatever I was doing and deal with the issue.  I knew how it felt to wait for support so I was determined to not let that happen to our fully managed hosting customers.

In 1998, the web hosting community was a fairly small and close-knit community and it didn’t take long for the word to get out that NationalNet had great support and very good uptime, so we started to get requests for hosting.  Our standard response was “no – we’re not really in the hosting business”.  Finally, a mutual friend of ours told us, “I don’t care what it costs, your fully managed hosting seems good and I want you to host me”.  We decided to throw out a big number thinking that they would say “no way!” and quit bothering us about it.  The price at that time was $1500/server set up,   $1500/month/server, and $1500/mpbs of bandwidth. Amazingly, the future customer replied, “Sign me up, now” and that, friends, is how NationalNet got the early reputation of the most expensive hosting money could buy…and we made sure it was darn well worth it.

From there, customers continued to sign up and NationalNet started to grow to the point where I had a decision to make.  I could choose to stay in Tucson and continue to try to make a living with my sites, or sell them and move to Atlanta and run NationalNet as a full time employee.  Obviously, I made the latter decision.

Over the next decade revenues went up, prices came down, but we kept growing in all verticals.  Not only did our finances grow but so did our family.  Heck, our first offices were in a three-bedroom apartment where we turned each bedroom into an office.  Of course, just to keep up with the growth we had to hire more people and that meant we needed more room.   So, about a year later we moved from that three-bedroom apartment to our very first “big boy” office. 

 It was a tiny office in a small strip mall, somewhere between an insurance company and a dry cleaner. The office was so tiny I worked out of the Conference Room most of the time just so I would have enough room to work. Just a short while later the office next door came open and we leased it, knocked out a wall, and I got my very own office with a window and room for the entire tech staff to be close enough to me to hear me holler down the hall.  

During this time of rocket growth not only did we add more employees we added more servers…lots and lots of servers.  It seemed like I blinked and our 8 servers became 80 and I remember when we found out that we had basically outgrown our data center provider.  They simply could not keep up with our growth.  At that time, we moved to our very own larger 2000 square foot data center and I really thought that would be enough to carry us for some time.  Then, I blinked again…

Our 8 servers had gone to 80 and then to 800 (and remember that in these days 4u servers were mostly what we used).  Our 2,000 square feet that should have held us for another 5+ years was already consumed in less than three years.

That is when I decided that we needed to take a big leap if we were going to continue to grow at the pace we had been in our short years as a host.  At the time, it was the largest under-taking that we had taken in our short lives and, needless to say, it took some coaxing to convince Tony to spend the millions of dollars it would take to complete this leap.  Not only did my plan involve taking over a 9,000 square foot, brand new Data Center that had been shed by the bankruptcy of GTE, it also included taking another 20,000 square foot of almost dilapidated office space across the street and building out 10,000 square foot of it into a Class-A office and Network Operations Center on our own dime.  Just the build-out of the office space alone was over $500,000 and we did not own the building, so we knew we had to stay there a long time for it to pay off.  For those of you that remember when the Tech Support staff would say, “let me run over to the Data Center to reboot your server” they were actually taking an elevator down 10 floors, running across the street, taking another elevator up 9 floors to get to your server.  Amazing, when I look back on it, that we could still reboot a server in about five minutes.

We grew into this solution with a little more grace than we had before.  Yes, we continued to grow, but we developed tools to make our solution much more streamlined, System Administrators got better, we became more pro-active with our monitoring and such so there was less fires to put out on a daily basis.  In a word, we became more “efficient”.  While we were busy becoming more efficient, servers were getting smaller, yet more powerful.  Their footprints were getting smaller but their more powerful processors were demanding more and more energy.  About 5 years later we got the news…”yes, you have more space in your 9,000 square foot data center, but we cannot provide you with any more power service to your floor”.  Friends, let me tell you from experience that a data center with floor space and no power is about as useless as the right shift button.  So we did it again…

Now, over 15 years from when it all began, we are in a beautiful, state-of-the-art, 73,000 square foot multi-tenant data center.  The 35,000 square foot section that contains NationalNet’s core hosting and colocation business was “purpose built” from scratch just over two years ago exactly the way we wanted it.  In addition, there is another 35,000+ square feet that we have available for larger, build-to-suit clients, or for NationalNet growth as needed for our future.  As for power, we are only 2.5MW into 8MW available that is expandable to 20MW when needed.  Needless to say, I am quite confident that this will be a large enough facility to last us for many, many years… but…I have said that before.

We have come a long way in over 15 years but there are still times when I miss that little apartment!

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08
Aug
2013

The Push for Unlocked Mobile Devices in the US Takes An Environmental Twist

by Administrator

you cannot unlock your phoneThe Push for Unlocked Mobile Devices in the US Takes An Environmental Twist

The Unlocking Consumer Choice and Wireless Competition Act which would decriminalize unlocking your handset was approved by the House Judiciary Committee yesterday. The bill will now move to the house floor and an uncertain future.

While unlocking a mobile handset is legal everywhere in the world other than the United States, opposition is lining up along the expected lines, namely “Big Copyright” a consortium made up of the movie and music industry and manufacturers, who as more and more devices include software, are pressing owners of their products to use factory authorized settings, even going so far as to sue those who repair their devices for copyright infringement declaring the entry of a password to enter diagnostics is an allegedly unauthorized reproduction of their intellectual property.

Environmentalists have recently entered the fray on the side of unlocking these devices as over one billion cell-phones are manufactured each year, and the environmental impact from the mining the rare metals, consumption of power and massive pollution from discarded older phones becomes noteworthy. From the reported 165 pounds of raw material to the vast majority of the power associated with a given device being consumed in its manufacture, not in its use – even electronics recyclers have already started mass-shredding functional phones from the United States because they can’t resell them internationally, and E-waste is a well known toxic pollutant with long term repercussions on the global environment.

Currently, 65% of all cell phones collected in the U.S. are refurbished or repaired, then resold. The catch is that those refurbishing the devices must unlock them in order to put them back on the market again, which involves breaking the existing law. Pro-copyright interests have argued that the ban protects their intellectual property, but legal unlocking gives consumers the ability to shop for the best service for their needs once they’ve satisfied the terms of their purchase contract with their carrier. The unlocking lobby argues that picking the digital lock that was placed on the phone doesn’t steal intellectual property, it’s making a modification to a product that is already owned outright by the consumer at that point.

Even AT&T and Verizon’s lobbying group, the CTIA, has thrown in the towel on this issue and issued a letter in favor of legal unlocking to the Judiciary Committee. If this phone unlocking legislation actually resolves the issue, legalizing phone portability may very well have a comparable impact to the earlier move by Congress mandating cell phone number portability, which was fought by the industry until its passage in 2003, and which finally freed consumers to keep their phone numbers if the decided to switch carriers.

Fostered by the collaborative sharing of knowledge made possible by the internet, more and more people are becoming tinkerers and the DIY cottage economy is better for it. Imagine where computers would be today if PC owners were not allowed to load unauthorized software on their own machines, modify hardware or alter their own computers under penalty of law after purchasing them.

 

As technology continues to evolve, the convergence of environmental impact, intellectual property rights and economics will continue to be a source of friction that stalls innovation and holds back consumer choice. NationalNet has focused considerable resources in terms of design and implementation to reduce our own environmental footprint by reducing power consumption.   We also recycle older servers and hard drives rather than just tossing them in a dumpster.  Finally, we are always seeking the most innovative ways to provide the best quality service for our clients using dedicated servers and fully managed hosting options that put customer choice at the top of our priority list.

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05
Aug
2013

Dropbox – Data Ubiquity And An Agnostic Platform Approach to Hosting

by Administrator

Dropbox – Data Ubiquity And An Agnostic Platform Approach to Hosting

Previous attempts like Apple’s MobileMe and Microsoft’s Briefcase aside, the notion of having files available to users across all platforms is a simple concept but has turned out to be very difficult to execute. In the end, users are often forced to email themselves files or carry physical copies of files around on discs and external drives to manually upload the latest edition of their files in a very inefficicient of system of syncing mobile, desktop or storage devices together.

Dropbox is a startup founded in 2007 that launched their flagship services in 2009 and created a simple virtual box on a whole host of devices, agnostic to which platform the user chose – PC, Mac, iPhone, whatever. The company’s motto, coined during a pitch meeting with venture capitalists is succinct: “It just works.”

In 2009, just a few months after launching their service, Drew Houston and Arash Ferdowsi – Dropbox’s twenty-something year old founders were called for a meeting at Apple to meet with the team handling the computing giant’s MobileMe service. The question posed floored them: “How did you get in there?” referring to Dropbox’s seamless integration within OSX’s “Finder” application. The answer was that they had essentially hacked their way in, using the program’s processing server to insert their own code. Ironically, though MobileMe was an Apple program, Apple’s own programmers were not allowed to make changes to Finder’s code. The meeting wasn’t an interrogation, it was an honest inquiry, as MobileMe was quite publicly floundering in the marketplace and an inability to synch files was the biggest deficiency it faced.

With no access to source code, Dropbox had discovered the assembly language that draws the icons and then squeezed in their icon, repeating the process for every different permutation of the operating system including Tiger, Leopard, Snow Leopard, 32 bit, 64 bit – all the while achieving the task that MobileMe couldn’t because the Dropbox team was not hindered by Apple’s own cross-department refusal to cooperate.

Similarly, Dropbox worked out integration with Microsoft Windows products, iOS and Android making it a complete cross-platform solution that “Just Works.” Dropbox’s competitors have been playing catch-up, Apple’s MobileMe became iCloud, which works really well for users who inhabit an Apple-only closed universe, Google has launched a web-based collaboration service accessed through web browsers, Amazon has its CloudDrive, an online storage locker, Microsoft Has Windows Live featuring SkyDrive which brings some automatic synching and cloud-based Windows programs to those who inhabit a Microsoft-only universe.

However, in an era when each tech titan tries to create walled gardens and closed ecosystems, Dropbox continues to capitalize on their technical lead, as the only competitor that offers true cross-platform ubiquity. Now Dropbox is opening up and allowing other services to piggyback on their system. Notably, Yahoo Mail is integrating Dropbox functionality with their email service, as are app makers like as Shutterstock, Check, Outbox and Loudr.

Dropbox seeks to become the universal standard and if their vision comes to fruition, it will mean that users will have finally have seamless integration of all of their data, so a game of Angry Birds can begin on an Android phone, and continue on your iPad. Switching from one smartphone platform to another would be seamless and painless as your data becomes truly ubiquitous – always available regardless of where you are and what device you’re choosing to use.

Just the way carriers have tried for years to artificially restrict access and treat their bandwidth as a branded resource rather than a generic option; device makers may soon start to find their software advantages eroded as developers produce apps and services that work across all platforms.

The idea of data ubiquity and an agnostic approach to access is something that NationalNet Hosting adopted long ago. When our clients seek collocated servers in our data center, custom software or unique management options that serve their business best, our team always takes the approach that is best for our clients. Even in instances where a fully managed hosting client requests certain hosting changes we are aware of the importance of keeping the same agnostic approach to technology in place. In an era where so many great new ideas are being launched by competing platforms, being able to cherry-pick the best of them and apply them all properly is the clearly the best way to go.

For More Information:

 

 http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/07/dropbox/

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