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05
Aug
2013

Dropbox – Data Ubiquity And An Agnostic Platform Approach to Hosting

by Administrator

Dropbox – Data Ubiquity And An Agnostic Platform Approach to Hosting

Previous attempts like Apple’s MobileMe and Microsoft’s Briefcase aside, the notion of having files available to users across all platforms is a simple concept but has turned out to be very difficult to execute. In the end, users are often forced to email themselves files or carry physical copies of files around on discs and external drives to manually upload the latest edition of their files in a very inefficicient of system of syncing mobile, desktop or storage devices together.

Dropbox is a startup founded in 2007 that launched their flagship services in 2009 and created a simple virtual box on a whole host of devices, agnostic to which platform the user chose – PC, Mac, iPhone, whatever. The company’s motto, coined during a pitch meeting with venture capitalists is succinct: “It just works.”

In 2009, just a few months after launching their service, Drew Houston and Arash Ferdowsi – Dropbox’s twenty-something year old founders were called for a meeting at Apple to meet with the team handling the computing giant’s MobileMe service. The question posed floored them: “How did you get in there?” referring to Dropbox’s seamless integration within OSX’s “Finder” application. The answer was that they had essentially hacked their way in, using the program’s processing server to insert their own code. Ironically, though MobileMe was an Apple program, Apple’s own programmers were not allowed to make changes to Finder’s code. The meeting wasn’t an interrogation, it was an honest inquiry, as MobileMe was quite publicly floundering in the marketplace and an inability to synch files was the biggest deficiency it faced.

With no access to source code, Dropbox had discovered the assembly language that draws the icons and then squeezed in their icon, repeating the process for every different permutation of the operating system including Tiger, Leopard, Snow Leopard, 32 bit, 64 bit – all the while achieving the task that MobileMe couldn’t because the Dropbox team was not hindered by Apple’s own cross-department refusal to cooperate.

Similarly, Dropbox worked out integration with Microsoft Windows products, iOS and Android making it a complete cross-platform solution that “Just Works.” Dropbox’s competitors have been playing catch-up, Apple’s MobileMe became iCloud, which works really well for users who inhabit an Apple-only closed universe, Google has launched a web-based collaboration service accessed through web browsers, Amazon has its CloudDrive, an online storage locker, Microsoft Has Windows Live featuring SkyDrive which brings some automatic synching and cloud-based Windows programs to those who inhabit a Microsoft-only universe.

However, in an era when each tech titan tries to create walled gardens and closed ecosystems, Dropbox continues to capitalize on their technical lead, as the only competitor that offers true cross-platform ubiquity. Now Dropbox is opening up and allowing other services to piggyback on their system. Notably, Yahoo Mail is integrating Dropbox functionality with their email service, as are app makers like as Shutterstock, Check, Outbox and Loudr.

Dropbox seeks to become the universal standard and if their vision comes to fruition, it will mean that users will have finally have seamless integration of all of their data, so a game of Angry Birds can begin on an Android phone, and continue on your iPad. Switching from one smartphone platform to another would be seamless and painless as your data becomes truly ubiquitous – always available regardless of where you are and what device you’re choosing to use.

Just the way carriers have tried for years to artificially restrict access and treat their bandwidth as a branded resource rather than a generic option; device makers may soon start to find their software advantages eroded as developers produce apps and services that work across all platforms.

The idea of data ubiquity and an agnostic approach to access is something that NationalNet Hosting adopted long ago. When our clients seek collocated servers in our data center, custom software or unique management options that serve their business best, our team always takes the approach that is best for our clients. Even in instances where a fully managed hosting client requests certain hosting changes we are aware of the importance of keeping the same agnostic approach to technology in place. In an era where so many great new ideas are being launched by competing platforms, being able to cherry-pick the best of them and apply them all properly is the clearly the best way to go.

For More Information:

 

 http://www.wired.com/wiredenterprise/2013/07/dropbox/

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22
Jul
2013

The End of “Unlimited” Cable Bandwidth May Be Fast Approaching

by Administrator

The End of “Unlimited” Cable Bandwidth May Be Fast Approaching

Cardozo Law School professor Susan Crawford is also an adjunct professor at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University, a Fellow at the Roosevelt Institute, a former ICANN board member and a Special Assistant to the President for Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy. In her recent book “Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly Power in the New Gilded Age”, Crawford took a deep look at the forces shaping the flow of bandwidth from carriers to consumers.

In an insightful Op-Ed Crawford penned for Wired Magazine she explores the future of consumer bandwidth as more consumers cut the cord and obtain their programming via ala carte services such as Hulu, Netflix and the like. The day is fast approaching when cable television is delivered in the form of IP packets just like any other data, and without billing package requirements artificially constructed by cable operators. With all of this  in mind, Crawford contends that the cable industry is working to eliminate “unlimited” bandwidth plans in favor of selling users bandwidth based on consumption.

In many areas, the local cable company has a virtual monopoly over bandwidth, particularly when it comes to the ability to provide the massive throughput that future content will require when publishers make 4K the new resolution industry standard.

Pushing for tiered pricing now, while it may be relatively easy to accustom users to the notion of paying per bit, when future bandwidth requirements would turn that kind of system into an unprecedented cash cow. Crawford foreshadows the arguments of providers like Liberty Media chairman John Malone who is likely to justify such pricing changes as a way of ‘limiting congestion’, when in reality according to Crawford it’s always about little more than maximizing profits. Most cable companies made their network investments quite a while ago and are now reaping massive rewards. In fact, according to Crawford, Time Warner Cable and Comcast have been bringing in revenue of more than seven times their investment in infrastructure for some time now.

Netflix has become a means by which many have reduced or eliminated their cable TV subscriptions, but with a use-based bandwidth business model that might change. Malone has already said it makes sense “So that, you know, Reed (Hastings, CEO of Netflix) has to bear in his economic model some of the capacity that he’s burning … And essentially the retail marketplace will have to reflect the true costs of these various delivery mechanisms and investments.” Translated into plain English, he’s saying that anyone who wants to transmit data over his network is going to have to pay him for the privilege and unless the consumer cost of bandwidth is tied in some way to the expense of providing it for consumers, the new more open arrangement where consumers can pick the specific channels they want may quickly start to be priced much the same way carriers have based their pricing for decades already

Any change to a per bit business model by bandwidth providers for consumers would have a profound impact on website owners as well. Proper optimization and hosting efficiency would take on an even bigger role in generating or maintaining traffic as visitors would undoubtedly become reticent to spend their time and precious bandwidth on sites that waste it unnecessarily. For that reason NationalNet continues to seek out every available method of delivering data in the most efficient manner possible, utilizing state of the art servers and hosting protocols carefully designed to provide the best user experience in the fastest and most economical manner possible for publishers and consumers alike.

 

Read more: http://www.wired.com/opinion/2013/07/big-cables-plan-for-one-infrastructure-to-rule-us-all

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15
Jul
2013

Networked Hosting Experts Learn New Lessons From Ant Colonies

by Administrator

Networked Hosting Experts Learn New Lessons From Ant Colonies

Ant colonies have a seemingly supernatural ability to survive, and are perhaps the most successful species on the planet, populating every continent and major landmass except Antarctica while acting as a super-organism with each individual producing in perfect synchronicity with the rest of the colony to collect resources, provide security and care for the health of their entire infrastructure without any direct central control.

Interestingly enough, a group of researchers at Stanford, recently found that the algorithm that desert ants use to regulate foraging is very similar to the Traffic Control Protocol  (TCP) used to regulate data traffic on the internet. Both the Internet and the “Anternet” utilize data systems driven by positive feedback, with the acknowledgment of data receipt triggering the next data transmission in a electronic network, the same way the return of forager ants triggers the deployment of more ants to retrieve resources for the colony for a fertile source.

Another example of the ants solving human computing problems is their solution to the ‘traveling salesman’ problem discussed previously on the NationalNet Hosting Blog in our post about quantum computing. Researchers have dubbed it the ant colony optimization algorithm. While no individual has any idea of what’s going on at a larger scale, each ant keeps track of its own recent experience meeting other ants, in one-on-one encounters when ants touch antennas, or when an ant encounters a chemical trail that has been deposited by another ant. From this seemingly limited communication, extremely sophisticated behaviors have resulted, responding to challenges in the ant’s environment, from the extraordinarily clever strategies for survival of army ants against every conceivable condition or adversary, to the agricultural practices of leaf-cutter ants that “farm” fungus they grow on vegetation the colony collects. 

Modeling the strategies of ant colonies has lead to some important insights on dealing with operating costs and scarcity. Harvester ant colonies, native to deserts, must expend water to obtain water. The ants lose moisture when out foraging in the hot sun, and obtain their water from the seeds that they collect. During a 25-year study of harvester ant colonies, scientists conclusively showed that the colonies learned to manage resources more efficiently by laying low during hot periods, and that the best optimized colonies had the largest number of offspring – evolving beyond the capabilities of other colonies that mistakenly scrambled to maximize productivity without forethought or efficiency. Waste created water costs too high to overcome, are failing maximizing their return on investment lead to many colonies disbanding entirely.

In the face of scarcity, the networking algorithm that regulates the flow of ants is evolving toward minimizing operating costs rather than immediate accumulation. This is a sustainable strategy for any system, be it a desert ant colony or the always on architecture of the mobile internet where avoiding waste has become crucial to optimized performance and reduced overhead expense.

Like human-engineered systems, ant systems must be able to scale up as the colony grows, with the ideal solutions ensuring that the benefit of additional resources outweighs the cost of producing them. Security, Reliability, Redundancy and Minimal Overhead are hallmarks of the Anternet. The same is true of any high quality human managed hosting solutions. Large, top-down solutions may seem appealing, but the ant algorithms show us that a simple ground-up approach can achieve a higher degree of sophistication with a reliability and error elimination capacity that other systems can’t match. Next time you find a few ants on your kitchen counter, take a moment to marvel at the elegance of the design of the network they operate within. NationalNet strives for the perfection in the way we provide reliable and cost-effective collocation hosting services for our clients.

Whether the best idea come from human engineers or billions of ants, our team of highly qualified system architects are ready to providing you and your customers with the best and most reliable managed hosting services as a result of our own ability to continue adapting and evolving our data centers to new ideas and system strategies.

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08
Jul
2013

Quantum Computing Becoming A Reality – Leading To Quantum Cloud Hosting

by Administrator

Quantum Computing Becoming A Reality – Leading To Quantum Cloud Hosting

D-Wave, a company that made the controversial claim that they have built the first world’s first quantum computer, got a big boost recently when researchers at the University of Southern California (USC) announced that they have confirmed that the machine is not utilizing “simulated annealing,” which was the leading theory of how the machine worked according to detractors who insisted that the computer could not possibly be a true quantum computer.

Quantum computing has been something of the holy grail of computing since it was first proposed in 1985 by British theoretical physicist David Deutsch. Unlike a classical computer which processes data on a transistor with a “bit” that can be “on” or “off” to yield the series of  “1s” or “0s” used to create binary code – a quantum computer would operate according to the strange principles of quantum mechanics which counter-intuitively allow data to exist in two states at once known as a “qubit” rather than a bit. In essence, a qubit can be a “0” and a “1” simultaneously under a rule known as the superposition principle of quantum mechanics. So, if a qubit can store a “0” and “1” simultaneously, and you add another qubit, they can hold four values at the same time: 00, 01, 10, and 11. As more qubits are added to the string, you end up with a computer that is exponentially more powerful than anything achievable with a conventional computer.

In theory quantum computers would solve combinatorial optimization problems. The classic example is figuring out the most efficient route for a traveling salesman going to multiple destinations. There’s no mathematical shortcut that conventional computers can take to solve combinatorial optimization problems. They are forced to run all possible combinations and determine the best path after all the calculation are complete. The problem with this approach is that the number of combinations rises exponentially with the number of variables. If there are six destinations, there are 64 possible combinations, 8 destinations have a total of 40,320 combinations, and with 20 destinations, the number explodes to 1,048,576 combinations.

D-Waves quantum computer is designed to handle as many as 512 variables, which results in a number of combinations that are outside the realm of possibility for any computer bound to the rules of classical physics, as the number of combinations is reportedly larger than the number of atoms in the universe, though we’re taking the scientist’s word for that, we haven’t counted them all ourselves.

According to its maker, the D-Wave machine contains 512 superconducting circuits, each a tiny loop of flowing current. These are cooled to almost absolute zero, so they enter a quantum state where the current flows both clockwise and counterclockwise at the same time. When you feed the machine a task, it uses a set of algorithms to map a calculation across these qubits and then executes that calculation. What emerges after the temperature is raised is the solution. If it sounds a bit like magic, it’s due to the very strange properties at play in quantum mechanics, though it has immense real world applications.

Lockheed Martin gave D-Wave a sample problem to solve, a bug in its F-16 software that had taken a team of their best engineers on classical computers months to track down, and the D-wave machine allegedly located it much more quickly. So quickly in fact that Lockheed Martin bought a D-Wave machine with a price range reported to be 15 million dollars.

Until recently, outsiders presumed the D-Wave machine was using a traditional computational process known as “simulated annealing” which in layman’s terms involves tunneling through data and attempting to predict the most likely outcomes. Now a peer reviewed scientific journal article titled Experimental Signature of Programmable Quantum Annealing has now been published in the well-respected academic journal Nature Communications and seems to completely disprove that assumption. Stopping short of proclaiming the D-Wave a true quantum computer, the paper does prove it is not using simulated annealing and moves the machine one step closer to full recognition.

The applications for this technology are nearly limitless. In addition to the aforementioned route planning, they include things like image recognition, genome sequence analysis, protein folding, scheduling, and risk analysis of the sort that high frequency stock traders rely on. So far defense contractor Lockheed Martin in partnership with USC and Google in partnership with NASA have bought D-wave machines.

D-Wave is also planning to launch a “Quantum Cloud,” in addition to selling it’s computers outright. With this service massive amounts of data will flow, providing near-instant solutions to remote computers, without the customer having to purchase or maintain the complicated and expensive super-cooled machines.

On the brink of a whole new kind of digital revolution, NationalNet will continue to keep pace with each technological advance, and stands ready for the onslaught of data that will necessarily accompany each advancement of the Fully Managed Hosting, providing our clients and their customers with the efficient bandwidth and data transfer speed that have made NationalNet the leader in modern hosting solutions presently and a forward thinking collocation partner for all of your hosting service needs.

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01
Jul
2013

Google Chief Engineer Ray Kurzweil Shows Future Of Hosting And Data Security

by Administrator

Ray Kurzweil is a renowned futurist who at age 64 was brought into Google late last year to preside over a loosely defined set of projects involving the storage and collection of data with the purpose of replicating the human psyche. After a long and prestigious career that has included winning the 1999 National Medal of Technology and Innovation, being credited  with creating the first text-to-speech synthesizer in the 1970s and authoring a best selling book titled “The Singularity Is Near” in 2005, Mr. Kurzweil raised some very interesting challenges on the horizon for fully managed hosting providers like NationalNet.

During the Global Futures 2045 International Congress, held in New York City last week, Kurzweil who has become known for some astoundingly accurate predictions about the future of technology years before they each came to fruition, stated emphatically that he believes humanity will be able to upload our minds to computers within the next 32 years and that within the next 90 years our bodies will be largely replaced or augmented by machines.

“Based on conservative estimates of the amount of computation you need to functionally simulate a human brain, we’ll be able to expand the scope of our intelligence a billion-fold” said Kurzweil, who went on to refer to Moore’s Law that states the power of computing doubles, on average, every two years while also cross-referencing the impact of recent developments from genetic sequencing efforts and 3D printing enhancements throughout his seminar.
Theorists may argue about the time line, claiming that what Kurzweil calls the ‘Singularity’ (a point when humans will effectively achieve intellectual immortality) may take place sooner or at a point more distant on the horizon of human achievements – but from a pragmatic perspective his comments underscore the increasing importance of data security and hosting that is always accessible to any intended audience.

Today, people expect their images and methods of communication to work flawlessly without fail or interruption. It’s easy to imagine how much higher the stakes will become when clients are asking to create backups of their grandmother’s consciousness or storage for your own life memory files to keep data restoration backups as current as possible at all times.

The bleeding edge of technological advancement, where science and science fiction rub up against each other so frequently, are vitally important for anyone interested in choosing to be properly preparation rather than frantically trying at the last minute to enjoy the benefits of emerging tech the moment it is unveiled on the market.

NationalNet already utilizes industry best practices and redundant procedures to secure the data of our clients to the highest preservation level possible as of this time. More importantly, we always have an eye toward what will soon become possible and you can remain assured that your sites (and perhaps one day your conscientiousness) will be fully protected by our expert staff utilizing the continually evolving scientific know-how necessary to keep your most valuable assets performing with peak optimization and maximum safety.

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21
Jun
2013

NSA Prism Surveillance – The Future Of Big Data Storage And Security

by Administrator

NSA Prism Surveillance – The Future Of Big Data Storage And Security

In recent weeks the media has been reporting heavily about the Prism surveillance program of the National Security Administration (NSA). For a moment, lets leave all the political discussion aside, and take a closer look at the sheer volume of data allegedly being managed by their clandestine data center because it brings some mind-bending mathematical realities to light in terms of scope and scale.

According to an in-depth report by Wired Magazine, the NSA Prism data center consists of “25,000-square-foot halls filled with servers, complete with raised floor space for cables and storage. In addition, there will be more than 900,000 square feet for technical support and administration. The entire site is self-sustaining, with fuel tanks large enough to power the backup generators for three days in an emergency, water storage with the capability of pumping 1.7 million gallons of liquid per day, as well as a sewage system and massive air-conditioning system to keep all those servers cool. Electricity will come from the center’s own substation built by Rocky Mountain Power to satisfy the 65-megawatt power demand.”

That much space and computing power is being harnessed so that the system can process, store and utilize yottabytes of data. A yottabyte is a data size so large that even until recently there was no consensus about what to name the next higher magnitude of data because it wasn’t in any danger of being reached. Even writing out the size of a yottabyte by hand can be tiring – a one followed by twenty-four consecutive zeros.

Eric Schmidt of Google once estimated that the total of all human knowledge from the start of human existence to 2003 could be store as 5 exabytes of information. However, the Internet covers much more than pure knowledge – bringing in far ranging aspects of personal communication, culture, and interaction. According to a report by Cisco, global web traffic is expected to more than quadruple between 2010 and 2015 to reach approximately 965 exabytes of data per year. Keep in mind, a single yottabyte is a million exabytes of data.

If the NSA does manage to collect a yottabyte of information, it would be equal to about 500 quintillion pages of text. A standard piece of paper is 0.09652 mm thick, meaning if you stacked 500,000,000,000,000,000,000 of them, all one on top of the other, your paper pile would be large enough to travel to the moon and back more than 50 million times.

The era of big data is clearly upon us, as we shift away from learning and relearning the same information to a point at which we are able to store, access and utilize information so quickly and reliably that it becomes part of our present perspective, rather than scattered abstracts that we try to gather together all over again and again each tine we need them.

On a commercial level, keeping pace with the growth of data and maintaining the infrastructure to manage or utilize it all efficiently will become one of the most pressing issues facing the IT world in the months and years to come. Finding a colocation solution that provides more than Ping, Power and Pipe from a technology partner committed to staying ahead of the curve will be even more essential to the success of your business than it already is today.

NationalNet brings all of the mission critical services, optimization and support functions your business needs to succeed as part of a fully managed hosting solution that scales seamlessly to suit the ‘exabyte needs’ of high volume clients today, and the ‘yottabyte needs’ that are likely to become commonplace in the online marketplace of tomorrow.

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18
Jun
2013

Apple Products Clear The Way For 802.11ac Networking

by Administrator

At their Word Wide Developer Conference (WWDC) Apple’s CEO Tim Cook and Jony Ive, the company’s Senior VP for design unveiled many new software and design improvements for Apple devices. While most media attention was given to the new interface design elements, gesture commands and iOS 7 upgrades, a very significant move toward the 802.11ac Networking WiFi protocol went largely unnoticed by the public – even though it is likely to have the most significant impact of all the innovations announced.

802.11ac is the next generation of WiFi and while it is already on the road to becoming the new standard, it has not taken root across all platforms yet. Lauded previously by a Cisco whitepaper as “a faster and more scalable version of 802.11n,” this fifth evolution of WiFi will allow wireless digital throughput with speeds of up to 1.3 Gigabits per second, more than doubling the bandwidth available from the current 802.11n industry standard. Perhaps even more importantly, 802.11ac introduces greatly enhanced scalability by allowing access for as many as eight multiple input, multiple output (MIMO) streams and multi-user MIMO, which will be a terrific leap forward from the four stream capacity of current 802.11n WiFi.

Part of the technological improvement comes from a new technique known as “beam-forming”, which directs a concentrated wireless signal to a specific device or location so that one device can access a greater proportion of the bandwidth available on a network. However, the technology requires both an 802.11ac wireless device and a router or base station that supports the new protocol. At the WWDC Apple announced that their new Airport Extreme base station and the 2013 MacBook Air will feature full 802.11ac support, while existing devices will be able to upgrade Airport Express for approximately $200.00 as a one time fee.

In the past, draft spec versions like 802.11ac have taken as long as five or six years to become the new industry standard because hundreds of companies are involved in developing Wi-Fi and provide a massive amount of input regarding the features being implemented. Even after a new specification is deemed to be technically and legally sound, there is still a lengthy administrative process that takes place before the new standard is ratified globally. For that reason, 802.11ac was expected to be approved and published in 2014 with new hardware using the protocol not expected to reach the market until 2015 or the following year.

Now, Apple appears to be jumping forward and counting on their considerable market share among mobile device users to push 802.11ac as quickly as possible, making the mobile version of your websites an even more important aspect of successful hosting than they have already become.

National Net continues to monitor the progress of 802.11ac, and will provide updates here on our blog that inform our clients about the technological advancements due out in the coming months. We are also taking all of the necessary steps to ensure that your hosting is able to handle the considerable growth of mobile broadband capacity, with scalable solutions designed to provide all of the throughput your customers demand at prices that demonstrate the highest level of connectivity and data efficiency.

Read More From These Sources For Further Information

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/wireless/ps5678/ps11983/white_paper_c11-713103.html

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17
Jun
2013

Cold Fusion at Last?

by Administrator

Cold Fusion at Last?

The holy grail of energy research, Cold Fusion, is again in the spotlight. Italian inventor Andrea Rossi claims his Energy Catalyzer (dubbed E-Cat) is capable of of 10,000 times the energy density and 1,000 times the power density of gasoline. Imagine running an entire data center off a single device the size of one cabinet! If a successful cold fusion device were finally built, with future miniaturization, every colocation cabinet could be run off its own, independent cold fusion power supply.

Until that day when cold fusion power supplies are readily available, NationalNet will continue to use grid power, backed up by world-class interruptible power supply and dual backup generators to keep our Atlanta data center and your Atlanta colocation servers and fully managed servers running 24/7.

Contact a NationalNet sales associate to talk about a business Atlanta colocation solution or fully managed hosting solution tailored to your company’s needs. Call us at 1-888-462-8638 or find us online at http://www.nationalnet.com

SOURCE: http://ow.ly/m7R07

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03
Jun
2013

Is your web hosting ready for 5 Gigabit Wireless?

by Administrator

5G Gigabit Wireless is Coming

Researchers at Samsung have successfully developed an ultrafast wireless technology they are officially dubbing “5G” (here we go again with the naming games- remember 4G LTE vs WiMAX vs EV-DO Rev C?). The technology has already be tested on the data-congested streets of New York City, showing gigabit speeds using an array of 64 antennas. The problem of building those antennas into a practical device that fits in your pocket is yet to be solved.

With ever increasing speeds over wireless devices, is your company’s data hosting solution ready? National Net’s colocation services are! We offer burstable bandwidth options, or choose your own carrier from hundreds in our SSAE 16 certified N+1 data center.

Contact a National Net sales associate to talk about a business colocation solution tailored to your company’s needs. Call us at 1-888-462-8638 or find us online at http://www.nationalnet.com

SOURCE: http://ow.ly/lFiXV

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29
May
2013

Don’t do colocation in your home

by Administrator

FiOS Customer Uses 77TB of Traffic in One Month

A California man ran a rack of servers in his home, connected via Verizon’s FiOS service that consumed an average of 30TB of data per month, peaking at 77TB in ONE MONTH! The man’s home-based solution is of course a via lotion of Verizon’s TOS, and certainly not ideal for business-critical services.

Colocation at National Net is the best solution for any business looking to host mission-critical data storage and network access with hundreds of available carriers or use our burstable bandwidth using our blend of approximately 40 providers. Our SSAE 16 certified N+1 data center has around-the-clock security and is staffed 24/7/365 by our friendly experts.

Contact a National Net sales associate to talk about a business colocation solution tailored to your company’s needs. Call us at 1-888-462-8638 or find us online at http://www.nationalnet.com

SOURCE: http://ow.ly/lvReB

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